Hooping: The Importance of Recording Yourself

Repost from our previous blog site hooptricks.org - originally published on March 20, 2014 at 7:21am

Perspective:

Recording yourself allows you to view your hooping from the camera or audience’s perspective. Mirrors or glass surfaces (such as windows), where you can see your reflection, are also great for doing this. Viewing yourself as others are viewing you allows for improvement and enhancement of visual performance concepts such as footwork, angle, hand placement, eye contact with the camera/audience, smiling, preciseness of lines, isolations, body rolls, etc., and overall, making your hooping look “pretty” and appealing to the camera or audience.

Visual Progress:

As you grow through hooping, it’s great to see visual progress. When you hoop everyday and watch yourself everyday, you are witnessing very small improvements each day. Whereas, if you record yourself and watch a video of your hooping from when you first started then watched a video of your hooping a year later, the improvement you’ve made is immense! It’s so exciting to see how far you’ve come and how much you’ve grown and accomplished.

Documentation:

It’s great to document your hooping journey through videos. Your videos tell a story—your story. I recently shared my thoughts and feelings about watching some of my older hooping videos, and here’s what I had to say:

“When I go through and watch old hooping videos of mine, I see more than hooping— I see the setting where the video took place, the music, the emotions flowing through me as I hoop. My videos tell a story. I can watch a video, and it takes me back to that place in time. I can remember how much that specific song meant to me at that time and why I felt like hooping to that song. I can reminisce of places I used to hoop, live, and venture to. My hooping videos document more than my hooping—they document my life, my memories, my feelings.”

Tricks/Movements:

If you’re like me, you may find yourself learning new tricks then forgetting about them over time or forgetting to incorporate them into your flow. When you watch older video clips of yourself, you might see yourself doing a move you don’t really do anymore. Therefore, hooping videos can serve as a great reminder of tricks you know and can practice incorporating into your hooping. In addition, you may purposefully create or accidentally stumble upon a new trick or new movement in your hooping. By recording yourself and watching the playback, you are able to remember the trick/movement, as well as seeing what it looks like to the camera or audience. What might have seemed like a “mess-up” could actually end up looking super cool!

Improvement:

By documenting, reviewing, and critiquing your hooping clips, you are able to see which areas you need improvement. Do you need to improve your facial expressions and improve on keeping a gentle smile on your face? Do you have an awkward arm flailing around when it’s not touching the hoop? Are you only doing tricks to one side of your body? It’s also great to share your videos with others and receive feedback.

Self-Promotion:

Recording yourself and creating videos allow you to promote yourself and your hoop journey. It’s a way of sharing your hooping journey, progress, and experiences with others. Hoop videos can be shared on YouTube, Vimeo, HoopCity, Facebook, Instagram, and so many sites and social networks. Hooping websites such as Hooping.org and HoopCity even have featured hooping videos each day/week. So what are you waiting for? Get out there and record yourself!